Microsoft

Posted by Kiran

Ever since I moved to Android from Windows Mobile, I have been complaining about the Android Platform's seeming limitation in handling Calendar reminders. The fact that the Android Calendar gave me only one 5-minute snooze option always troubled me and I have written about this annoyance in the past too.

I promptly bought Calendar Snooze, an application available in the Android Market which allows users to choose the duration of time for which the reminder must be snoozed, and even recommended it in one of my blog posts.

When I noticed that Google had neglected to include the feature in their much hyped Android 2.2 (Froyo) as well, I couldn't understand why Google chose to ignore such basic functionality.

However, in all my eagerness to lambast Google at their oversight, I seem to have neglected one design feature of the Google Calendar, which renders the snooze option redundant.

Posted by Kiran

One of the disadvantages with having to manage multiple Exchange Accounts is that it is very difficult to get a unified view of the all the accounts. Be it email or calendar schedule, each Exchange account could potentially have a different set that have to be dealt with. Microsoft Products only allow access to one Exchange account at a time, and that complicates things.

For emails I just move them into PST folders organized by project, initiative, topic, whatever the case may be. Once these emails — whichever Exchange Account they came from — are in their folders, I can easily get a chronological view of what conversations were going on related to that piece work.

Getting a similar view of appointments is trickier. I always like to know when my meetings are scheduled and ensure I am not double-booked at any particular time before I respond to meeting requests.

Managing this with two Outlook Profiles is next to impossible. However, I found a rather unique way of handing this issue. I use the "Publish to Internet" feature in Outlook 2007 to do this.

Posted by Kiran

Microsoft came out with the Windows Phone 7 Series during the Mobile World Congress in February 2010. With the Windows Phone, Microsoft has drastically changed the way they intend for the user to interact with their devices. It has been touted as the Mobile OS that will enable Microsoft to capture the market back from Apple's iPhone.

I have been a devoted Windows Mobile user since my days with Pocket PC 2002 on my Compaq iPAQ 3850.

When Apple came out with the iPhone, it was definitely worth sitting up and taking notice! It was a new concept and a glamorous one at that. Suddenly, the Windows Mobile looked jaded and just another old phone. However, I stuck with it primarily due to the fact that the iPhone was, and still is, too locked in. I cannot install anything or do anything on the phone without Apple explicitly allowing me to do so. The only other way is to "jailbreak" the phone; something that would void my warranty.

Devices running Windows Mobile were a stark contrast — though they embodied flexibility and customizability with numerous vendors providing applications that added great functionality, they lacked touch-friendliness. With Windows Mobile 7, or the Windows Phone 7 Series as Microsoft like to call the new version of their Mobile OS, they have brought in a whole new paradigm! It is no longer a computer on a phone; it is a consumer phone with possibilities.

Posted by Kiran

All of us know that Microsoft Excel allows us to hide certain worksheets from view. Hiding sheets helps us in ensuring that any background lookup data or reference data that you want to utilize in your spreadsheets remain neatly tucked away from general view.

You may also want to prevent users from viewing certain numbers that are used in calculation on your spreadsheets. Hiding worksheets simply makes the workbook clutter free and helps readers focus on the spreadsheets that really matter.

The only disadvantage with simply hiding your worksheets is that it is equally easy to unhide them. Any Excel user worth his salt knows how to find and unhide a hidden sheet. To prevent users from unhiding your worksheets, you may choose to protect the workbook. However when you protect a workbook, you are also preventing the users from a myriad of other functionality that they may genuinely require.